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The Sew Bros

I don’t know about you, but when I hear the word sewing, the image in my head is clear — a woman, usually on the older side, hunched over her sewing machine, either assembling a…

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I don’t know about you, but when I hear the word sewing, the image in my head is clear — a woman, usually on the older side, hunched over her sewing machine, either assembling a last-minute costume for her kids or grandkids or mending a pair of ripped jeans.

But, what if I told you that the one sitting in front of that machine was actually a boy in his mid-twenties?

Our lives are filled with stereotypes, especially when it comes to gender, but thankfully there are people willing to question such stereotypes and the Sew Bros might just fit into this category.

The Sew Bros

Quarantine has had the most unexpected effects on many of us, often pushing us to do things we wouldn’t have thought, to act in ways we wouldn’t have imagined and even take up hobbies we would have never considered like, say, sewing.

This was the case for Jonathan Simanjuntak, a 23-year-old boy from Colorado, USA that decided to make the most of his quarantine time by taking up sewing. After visiting a bunch of thrift stores in search of some fabric and rags he could upcycle, he was able to teach himself how to sew. He then posted a photo of his creation, a Dickies-inspired jacket, to the Reddit community /r/ sewing.

As it turns out though, Jonathan was not an isolated case. Right around the same time, a spike in the purchase of sewing machines was recorded by companies such as Merchant & Mills and John Lewis and, contrary to what one may expect, many of the customers were men.

What pushed them to take up sewing?

What is pushing men to discover this craft? For some of them, like Jonathan, not being able to afford designer clothes is a big part of why they do it. Making your own clothes in fact often means being able to wear stylish, unique and good quality clothes without necessarily spending a fortune on them.

However, other ‘sew bros’ seem to have been moved by deeper reasons. Take Mehedi Sarri, for example, 32-year old Redditor, who discovered his passion for sewing when he lost his job and now sees sewing as a good way to combat the exploitation that takes place in the fast fashion industry.

“When you start sewing, spending six to eight hours on a garment, you realize the value of your clothes. Then you start doing the math and it doesn’t add up. How is it possible to sell clothes so cheap?”

What do you think? Will we soon be able to finally reject this stereotype or will men who sew forever be a minority?

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